1.  
TE  SF
Rec
89
Rec Yds
1144
Rec TD
8
Rec Avg
12.9
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Kittle is rapidly building a case as one of the better fifth-round draft picks in NFL history, ripping off back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons at a position where only two or three players reach that mark each year. He couldn't quite match his tight end yardage record from 2018, but Kittle was the furthest thing from a slouch last season, ranking 12th among pass catchers in yards per game (75.2) and 14th in yards per target (9.8). His average target depth dropped from 7.3 yards to 5.7, and while there was a corresponding dip in yards per reception, Kittle's catch rate shot up to elite territory at 79.4 percent. He may not get the same downfield opportunities as Travis Kelce, but Kittle is even better than his TE counterpart at picking up yards after the catch, and the 26-year-old also had lower drop rates in both 2018 and 2019. Kittle's greatest weaknesses - at least from a fantasy standpoint - are actually strengths from the 49ers' perspective. He plays too hard, he blocks too much and sometimes he can be too invested in tasks that don't produce stats. Kittle has missed only three games in three seasons, but he's played through a torn shoulder labrum, fractured rib cartilage and a bone spur in his ankle. That probably makes Kelce the safer TE1 choice, but Kittle is the one with superhuman talent.
2.  
TE  KC
Rec
93
Rec Yds
1167
Rec TD
7
Rec Avg
12.5
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Kelce offers an unmatched combination of floor and ceiling at tight end, missing just one game in the last six seasons while totaling at least 862 yards and four or more touchdowns each year. That includes four in a row with more than 1,000 yards and back-to-back seasons with more than 1,200. He peaked in 2018 along with the rest of Kansas City's offense, riding the Patrick Mahomes wave to career highs in every significant counting stat. Apart from the touchdowns, Kelce came pretty close to a repeat last year, and he did it while handling a snap share higher than 90 percent for a fourth time in the last five seasons. He capped off the campaign with 19 receptions for 207 yards and four touchdowns in three playoff games, displaying the usual first-rate chemistry with Mahomes. A late start to his pro career means Kelce will turn 31 during the early portion (October) of what's essentially his seventh season, but any signs of decline have been entirely absent. Locked in as an every-down player in the NFL's most dangerous offense, Kelce will be the first tight end off the board in most fantasy drafts, with only George Kittle challenging the throne.
3.  
TE  BAL
Rec
82
Rec Yds
1028
Rec TD
9
Rec Avg
12.5
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Andrews made good on the promise of his late-season rookie surge, breaking out in 2019 as the top receiving weapon in the NFL's highest-scoring offense. Of course, it was also the league's most run-heavy offense, which explains how he fell a tick shy of triple-digit targets despite accounting for 23 percent of the team total in his 15 active games (he sat out a meaningless Week 17 contest). Andrews was a true statistical anomaly, finishing fourth among TEs in target share and fifth in total targets but only 35th in snaps (467, 44.2 percent share). It might be argued that the modest snap counts actually worked in his favor, with Andrews handling minimal blocking work while regularly taking the field for passing downs. On the other hand, there were at least two or three games where his modest workloads appeared to be related to nagging foot, ankle or knee injuries. With no report of surgery being needed during the offseason, Andrews is locked in as one of the preferred targets for reigning MVP Lamar Jackson, who enters his age-23 season with the potential for continued development as a passer. Andrews probably can't sustain the outrageous per-snap production from last season, but he can make up the difference with more playing time now that former backup Hayden Hurst is off to Atlanta and out of the Ravens' picture.
4.  
TE  PHI
Rec
93
Rec Yds
1010
Rec TD
7
Rec Avg
10.9
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Ertz took a step back in 2019, though he once again was the Eagles' only reliable pass catcher, a role that kept him top 5 among tight ends in targets, catches and yards. His 6.8 YPT was a career low, but it wasn't a matter of an unusual number of drops (seven, 5.2 percent), and his YAC average (3.2) was unchanged from 2018. The Eagles' lack of downfield weapons finally seemed to catch up to Ertz, with his catch rate hitting its lowest point since 2014 as opponents had little else to worry about with the Philadelphia passing game. It didn't help that fellow TE Dallas Goedert took some scoring chances away from Ertz, who finished with a three-year low for red-zone targets (16) and a four-year low for targets inside the 10 (five). However, Ertz was still a three-down player throughout the season, ranking fourth among TEs in snap share (85.9) - his fourth consecutive year reaching 80 percent. The Eagles' offseason overhaul of their wideout group creates more competition for targets, and possibly even snaps, but it could also create an offense where the 29-year-old Ertz has more room to operate and thus moves back toward his pre-2019 career marks for catch rate (69.4 percent) and YPT (7.7). In addition to the possibility of a healthier season from DeSean Jackson, the Eagles can strike fear in the hearts of opposing safeties with rookie wideouts Jalen Reagor (4.47 40), John Hightower (4.45) and Quez Watkins (4.35). If the speed element proves dangerous, it'll be feeding time underneath for Ertz, Goedert and Miles Sanders.
5.  
TE  LV
Rec
82
Rec Yds
948
Rec TD
6
Rec Avg
11.6
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Waller took the long path to NFL stardom, with his breakout performance occurring four days before he turned 27 in Week 1 last year. He doubled his career receiving yardage by Week 3, eventually finishing the season top 3 among tight ends in catches and yards. Waller also tied for second among tight ends in YPT (9.8), while he was sixth in YAC average (6.6) and second in broken tackles (eight). Four years earlier, the sixth-round pick had entered the NFL as an oversized wide receiver before transitioning to tight end in his second season with the Ravens, but he never had much of a chance to develop at the position while serving suspensions for substance abuse violations. Waller has been open about his struggle, pointing to a sober, healthy lifestyle as the spark that eventually led to on-field success. Clearly impressed, the Raiders signed him to a four-year, $29.8 million extension in October, though they also went shopping for depth in the offseason with Jason Witten coming in on a one-year contract. While there's no doubt Waller will be the team's top receiving threat at tight end, he could see his snaps scaled back from last year's 90.3 percent share, with any decrease potentially impacting his target volume. There is also some incoming target competition from other positions, after the Raiders selected Henry Ruggs, Lynn Bowden and Bryan Edwards within the first three rounds of the 2020 draft. The good news is that Waller has shown enough talent and polish to survive as a fantasy asset even if his volume dips.
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