RB  DEN
Rush Att
126
Rush Yds
534
Rush TD
5
Rush Avg
4.2
Rec
21
Rec Yds
144
Rec TD
0
Rec Avg
6.9
When Denver picked him in the third round of the 2018 draft and C.J. Anderson was subsequently released, Freeman seemed poised to step right in as the new lead back. Then Phillip Lindsay happened, and the more highly touted rookie was forced to settle for scraps throughout the year. Freeman possesses the size NFL teams look for at 6-0, 229, and his combination of burst and straight-line speed gives him the potential to crash into the second level and hit for a big play, but he got few chances to showcase those skills working behind the more dynamic Lindsay. Freeman did at least impress in short-yardage situations - he got five carries inside the 5-yard line and turned three into TDs - and given the trouble Lindsay had staying healthy late in the year, Freeman should see an increased workload even if only to save his fellow second-year RB some wear and tear. Should a major breakdown for the undersized Lindsay push him into a starting role, Freeman could become the focal point of a Broncos offense trying to find its identity after adding Joe Flacco and 2019 second-round pick Drew Lock in the offseason to compete at QB.
RB  CLE
Rush Att
269
Rush Yds
1190
Rush TD
11
Rush Avg
4.4
Rec
42
Rec Yds
333
Rec TD
2
Rec Avg
7.9
Chubb opened his debut season buried on the depth chart behind Carlos Hyde, but after he exploded for 105 rushing yards and two TDs on only three carries in Week 4, it was only a matter of time before the rookie shoved the veteran aside. Chubb didn't see double-digit carries until Hyde was traded to the Jaguars in Week 7, but once he did he was a force, averaging more than 80 rushing yards a game with 4.7 YPC. Chubb doesn't offer a lot as a receiver, but with Duke Johnson around to handle passing-down assignments he can focus on being the thunder in the Browns' backfield, using his power and surprising balance to stay on his feet through contact. His 41 broken tackles on rushes ranked eighth in the NFL, and Chubb only saw nine carries inside the 5-yard line, a number that could rise significantly now that Cleveland knows what he's capable of. The offseason signing of Kareem Hunt raises questions, but he won't be eligible to return from suspension until Week 10. In any case, the trade for Odell Beckham Jr. should create a high-powered offense that gives Chubb plenty of carries near the goal line even if he shares snaps.
RB  DET
Rush Att
239
Rush Yds
1070
Rush TD
6
Rush Avg
4.5
Rec
43
Rec Yds
344
Rec TD
2
Rec Avg
8.0
For an eight-game stretch in the middle of last season, the Lions looked like they'd found their new feature back in Johnson. The rookie amassed 751 scrimmage yards and four TDs Weeks 3-11 while seeing little more than 16 touches a game before a knee injury cut short his season. His 5.53 YPC in that span ranked third in the league. He showed traits of No. 1 RB in the NFL, running with power, balance and burst with aptitude as a receiver, but he might not have the frame to withstand the punishment his running style brings over a 16-game schedule. The switch at offensive coordinator from Jim Bob Cooter to Darrell Bevell should benefit Johnson, though. Bevell ran the Vikings and Seahawks offenses during the primes of Adrian Peterson and Marshawn Lynch, so he has a long track record of bringing out the best in his backfields. The Lions brought in C.J. Anderson to be a reliable veteran backup in case Johnson breaks down again, and Theo Riddick is still around to handle some passing downs, so it's unlikely Johnson suddenly becomes a 300-touch bell cow. The good news is his efficiency from last season suggests the second-year back can be quite productive with a similar per-game workload.
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